Interview: LGBT Youth and Homelessness

Spiritual Friendship

The best available research suggests that between 20 and 40 percent of homeless youth identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender. When youth come out (or their sexuality is discovered against their will), some families reject them, pushing them onto the streets, where they are often even more vulnerable to prejudice and abuse than other homeless youth. They will also encounter a legal system which can be more focused on punishing and imprisoning the homeless than on helping them to get off the streets. And as rising social and peer acceptance has emboldened teens to come out at a younger age, more youth are over-estimating their parents’ readiness to deal with revelations about their sexuality, with tragic—even life-threatening—consequences.

This is a problem which Christian parents and pastors need to understand and take much more seriously, since it is, in part, an unintended consequence of Christian activism for traditional marriage. Moreover, since Christian ministries…

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Good, Bad, Complicated

Heart-to-Hartley

Last Friday, June 26, 2015, the United States Supreme Court made history in a controversial 5-4 ruling that declared all state bans on same-sex marriage unconstitutional, effectively legalizing same-sex marriage in all fifty states.  It would be an understatement to say that for the American public, emotions ran high.

As a committed believer who holds to the traditional, historical Christian teaching on sexuality, but who is also exclusively attracted to the same sex (celibate gay Christian, for short), it has been incredibly difficult to sort out my thoughts and feelings regarding the Supreme Court’s decision on Friday.

On the one hand, I can totally empathize with my gay and lesbian friends who view this ruling as a major victory, finally being able to have their genuine love for one another protected by the law. Coming to the end of a long struggle for marriage equality, and experiencing the freedom that comes along with…

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